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The Kids are Alright: An Interview with Eugene Wei and Julie Young (Gift Culture, Part 4)

Welcome to the fourth and final segment in this series on Gift Culture at the Online Frontier. If you missed any of the first three, you can catch up here: Gift Culture, Part 1: Homesteading the Twittersphere Gift Culture, Part 2: The SE Suite, An interview with Julie Young Gift Culture, Part 3: Scarcity Status versus Abundance Status  Today Julie is back with us to help close things out, along with our second very special guest, coming in to bat cleanup: Eugene Wei.  If you’ve spent any time on Tech… Read more The Kids are Alright: An Interview with Eugene Wei and Julie Young (Gift Culture, Part 4)

Homesteading the Twittersphere

If you go to the About page on Matthew Ball’s website, you’ll find a quote from Jason Hirschhorn: “Kevin Mayer called and said ‘Hey, Bob Iger and I would like to have lunch with you’…And Iger, I’m going to paraphrase here, says ‘You know, you’re an idiot.’ And I’m like, ‘Why is that, Bob?’ And he goes, “You give away for free what we pay tens of millions of dollars a year from management consultants for.”  Kevin was talking about Matt’s Disney-as-a-Service post from 2016; but it could have been any of his… Read more Homesteading the Twittersphere

It’s Not Debt, It’s Better: an Interview with Harry Hurst of Pipe

This week, I’m delighted to share an interview with Harry Hurst, founder and co-CEO of Pipe.  Six months ago I wrote a post in the newsletter called Debt is Coming, about the all-equity model of funding startups finally coming to the end. It ran away to become the most widely-read thing I’ve ever written, ever. (Read it first, if you haven’t yet.) Since then, I’ve had a blast getting to meet all sorts of interesting founders, operators and investors who are thinking about the future of financing recurring revenue software… Read more It’s Not Debt, It’s Better: an Interview with Harry Hurst of Pipe

SPAC Man Begins

Three years ago, Chamath sat us all down at a Social Capital all hands meeting and told us about this great new thing we were gonna do. It was called a SPAC.  A SPAC (“Special Purpose Acquisition Company”, or “blank check company”), he told us, was a new way we were going to help take big tech companies public. Going public is an important moment in a company’s life. It’s a transition from one state to another, it’s a stressful but monumental transition, and the current way we do it –… Read more SPAC Man Begins